Category: Audible MBA


Book summary and outline of Winning by Jack Welch

Chapter 1: Mission & Values

My Comments
Jack uses mission like Joel Barker uses vision as a focal point for everything the organization does. He obviously was very adept (being entrepreneur of the century) at integrating culture (values and mission) and business strategy together to create a focused effort. If you get a chance to see him live do so. However, the book is easy reading, direct and practical so any entrepreneur or business manager can integrate his concepts into their business.

On Mission
In my experience, an effective mission statement basically answers one question: How do we intend to win in this business?

GE’s Mission
To be “the most competitive enterprise in the world” by being No. 1 or No. 2 in every market – fixing, selling, or closing every underperforming business that couldn’t get there.

Setting The Mission
Setting the mission is top management’s responsibility. A mission cannot, and must not, be delegated to anyone except the people ultimately held accountable for it.

Values
Create them: People must be able to use them as marching orders because they are the how of the mission, the means to the end – winning. In contrast to the creation of a mission, everyone in a company should have something to say about values.

Integrating Mission & Values
A concrete mission is great. And values that describe specific behaviors are too. But for a company’s mission and values to truly work together as a winning proposition, they have to be mutually reinforcing.

Chapter 2 On Candor
The lack of candor is business’ dirty little secret.
It works because candor de-clutters.
Candor leads to winning in 3 ways:
A. Gets more people in conversation.
B. It generates speed.
C. It cuts cost….a lot.

Chapter 3: Differentiation
Differentiation Defined
Basically, differentiation holds that a company has two parts, software and hardware. Software is simple—it’s your people. Hardware depends. If you are a large company, your hardware is the different businesses in your portfolio. If you are smaller, your hardware is your product lines.

The People Part
It’s a process that requires managers to assess their employees and separate them into three categories in terms of performance: top 20 percent, middle 70, and bottom 10. Then—and this is the key—it requires managers to act on that distinction. I emphasize the word “act” because all managers naturally differentiate—in their heads. But very few make it real. Rather, differentiation is about managers looking at the middle 70, identifying people with potential to move up, and cultivating them. But everyone in the middle needs to be motivated and made to feel as if they truly belong. You do not want to lose the vast majority of your middle 70—you want to improve them. As for the bottom 10 percent in differentiation, there is no sugarcoating this—they have to go.
I didn’t invent differentiation! I learned it on the playground when I was a kid.

When people differentiation is real, the top 20 percent of employees are showered with bonuses, stock options, praise, love, training and a variety of rewards to their pocketbooks and souls. There can be no mistaking the stars at a company that differentiates. They are the best and are treated that way.

Chapter 4: Voice and Dignity
The belief is this: every person in the world wants voice and dignity, and every person deserves them.

Chapter 5: Leadership: It’s Not Just About You
Before you are a leader, success is all about growing yourself. When you become a leader, success is all about growing others. What Leaders Do: Jack’s 8 Rules
1. Leaders relentlessly upgrade their team, using every encounter as an opportunity to
evaluate, coach, and build self-confidence.
2. Leaders make sure people not only see the vision, they live and breathe it.
3. Leaders get into everyone’s skin, exuding positive energy and optimism.
4. Leaders establish trust with candor, transparency, and credit.
5. Leaders have the courage to make unpopular decisions and gut calls.
6. Leaders probe and push with a curiosity that borders on skepticism, making sure their questions are answered with action.
7. Leaders inspire risk taking and learning by setting the example.
8. Leaders celebrate.
Talk about the vision, direction so everyone knows it in the sleep and talk about it with everyone so you get sick of hearing yourself and then tie in $, bonuses, security, promotions when they become it.

Chapter 6: What Winners Are Made Of
Nothing matters more in winning than getting the right people on the field.

The Acid Tests
1. The first test is for integrity.
2. The second test is for intelligence.
3. The third ticket to the game is maturity.

The 4-E (And 1-P) Framework
1. The first E is positive energy.
2. The second E is the ability to energize others.
3. The third E is edge, the courage to make tough yes-or-no decisions.
4. Which leads us to the fourth E-execute-the ability to get the job done.
5. If a candidate has the four E’s, then you look for that final P-passion.

Hiring For The Top
1. The first characteristic is authenticity.
2. The second characteristic is the ability to see around corners.
3. The third characteristic is a strong penchant to surround themselves with people better and smarter than they are.
4. The fourth characteristic is heavy-duty resilience.

Chapter 7: People Management – You’ve Got The Right Players. Now What?
People management covers a wide range of activities, but it really comes down to six fundamental practices.
1. Elevate HR to a position of power and primacy in the organization, and make sure HR people have the special qualities to help managers build leaders and careers. In fact, the best HR types are pastors and parents in the same package.
2. Use a rigorous, nonbureaucratic evaluation system, monitored for integrity with the same intensity as Sarbanes-Oxley Act compliance.
3. Create effective mechanisms—read: money, recognition, and training—to motivate and retain.
4. Face straight into charged relationships—with unions, stars, sliders, and disrupters.
5. Fight gravity, and instead of taking the middle 70 percent for granted, treat them like the heart and soul of the organization.
6. Design the org chart to be as flat as possible, with blindingly clear reporting relationships and responsibilities.

Chapter 9: Change – Mountains Do Move
It comes down to embracing four practices:
1. Attach every change initiative to a clear purpose or goal. Change for change’s sake is stupid and enervating.
2. Hire and promote only true believers and get-on-with-it types.
3. Ferret out and get rid of resisters, even if their performance is satisfactory.
4. Look at car wrecks.

With all the noise out there about change, it’s easy to get overwhelmed and confused.

Chapter 10: Crisis Management – From Oh-God-No to Yes-We’re Fine
5 Things to Assume.
First, assume the problem is worse than it appears.
Second, assume there are no secrets in the world and that everyone will eventually find
out everything.
Third, assume you and your organization’s handling of the crisis will be portrayed in the worst possible light.
Fourth, assume there will be changes in processes and people. Almost no crisis ends without blood on the floor.
Fifth, assume your organization will survive, ultimately stronger for what happened.

A Way To Prevent Crisis
Create a culture of integrity, meaning a culture of honesty, transparency, fairness, and strict adherence to rules and regulations. In such cultures, there can be no head fakes or winks. People who break the rules do not leave the company for “personal reasons”. They are hanged—publicly—and the reasons are made painfully clear to everyone.

Chapter 11: Strategy – It’s All In The Sauce
Strategy is a living, breathing, totally dynamic game. It’s fun—and fast. And it’s alive. In real life, strategy is actually very straightforward. You pick a general direction and implement like hell.

§ First, come up with a big aha for your business—a smart, realistic, relatively fast way to gain sustainable competitive advantage.
§ Second, put the right people in the right jobs to drive the big aha forward.
§ Third, relentlessly seek out the best practices to achieve your big aha, whether inside our out, adapt them, and continually improve them.

Strategy, then, is simply finding the big aha and setting a broad direction, putting the right people behind it, and then executing with an unyielding emphasis on continual improvement. I couldn’t make it more complicated that that if I tried.

Making Strategy Real: 5 Points
1. What the Playing Field Looks Like Now
2. What the competition has been up to
3. What you’ve been up to
4. What’s around the corner
5. What’s your winning move

The Right People
Any strategy, no matter how smart, is dead on arrival unless a company brings it to life with people—the right people.

Budgeting –Jack’s Way
q How can we beat last year’s performance?
q What is our competition doing, and how can we beat them?

But there are really just four practices that matter: Communicate a sound rationale for every change. Have the right people at your side. Get rid of the resisters. And seize every single opportunity, even those from someone else’s misfortune. That’s it.

Don’t get all caught up in your knickers over change.

You just don’t need to.

Mergers & Acquisitions
· Fast way to grow

Six Sigma
Nothing compares to the effectiveness of Six Sigma when it comes to improving a company’s operational efficiency, raising its productivity, and lowering its costs. Six Sigma is a quality program that, when all is said and done, improves your customers’ experience, lowers your costs, and builds better leaders. Six Sigma accomplishes that by reducing waste and inefficiency and by designing a company’s products and internal processes so that customers get what they want, when they want it, and when you promised it. Make no mistake: Six Sigma is not for every corner of a company.

The Right Job

Work-Life Balance
While work-life balance was increasingly front and center during the 1990’s, the debate about it has only intensified since my retirement in 2006. Today, no CEO or company can ignore it.

1. Your boss’s top priority is competitiveness. Of course he wants you to be happy, but only inasmuch as it helps the company win.
2. Most bosses are perfectly willing to accommodate work-life balance challenges if you have earned it with performance. The key word here is: if.
3. Bosses know that the work-life policies in the company brochure are mainly for recruiting purposes and that real work-life arrangements are negotiated one-on-one in the context of a supportive culture, not in the context of “But the company says….!”
4. People who publicly struggle with work-life balance problems and continually turn to the company for help get pigeonholed as ambivalent, entitled, uncommitted or incompetent—or all of the above.
5. Even the most accommodating bosses believe that work-life balance is your problem to solve. In fact, most know that there are really just a handful of effective strategies to do that, and they wish you would use them.

John M. Ruh’s Support
If you want to discuss this book we will facilitate a one time, free mini session (1 hour) with you and your core team to discuss how to integrate these concepts into your business.

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Key 1. Introduction and overview: welcome to the journey.
Key 2. Develop emotional intelligence.
Key 3. Manage your time wisely.
Key 4. Learn to manage stress.
Key 5. Practice self-motivation.
Key 6. Leaders aren’t born that way.
Key 7. Make yourself into a leader.
Key 8. All power is relative: building your power bases.
Key 9. Practice effective goal setting.
Key 10. Help others improve performance.
Key 11. Empower others
Key 12. Build effective teams.
Key 13. Practice ethical leadership.
Key 14. Communicate clearly.
Key 15. Lead effective meetings.
Key 16. Present as a pro.
Key 17. Lead through active listening.
Key 18. Be conscious of nonverbal communications.
Key 19. Manage conflict.
Key 20. Manage organizational culture.
Key 21. Get ready for globalization.
Key 22. Initiate change well.
Key 23. Define your organization’s vision, mission, values, credo, goals and strategy.
Key 24. Use participation to create vision.
Key 25. Turn vision into reality

Good is the Enemy of Great

This idea is similar to the “good is never enough” concept from Built to Last. In this section of the book, Collins urges companies to focus equally on what to do, what not to do, and what to stop doing. He believes that most companies focus too much on what to do and ignore what not to do or what they should stop doing. What are you doing based on tradition or industry standards? What assumptions or processes have you rested on because they were “good enough?” Good should be viewed as horrible because neither “great”.

Level 5 Leadership

This term “Level 5 Leadership” is used to describe a certain type of leader who was seen among many of the companies, which made the leap from good to great. They were more than just “clock builders”, they had unique characteristics such as humility and professional will towards excellence. This type of a leader is known for taking credit for bad performance while giving credit to others when things go well.

First Who… Then What

Collins says, “People are not your most important asset. The right people are.” He uses the analogy of a bus driver to while describing how to create a winning team within your organization. He recommends that you first get the right people on the bus, and then you get the wrong people off the bus, then the right people in the right seats, and then figure out where you want to drive that bus. Hire people with characteristics you cannot easily instill. Focus on who you are paying, not how. He also recommends analyzing someone’s character, work ethic, intelligence, and dedication to their values before deeply analyzing credentials and practical skills.

Confront the Brutal Facts

Collins found that companies that made the leap from good to great, had a consistent belief in their ability to succeed in the end. He believes that if companies do their due diligence and gather all of the facts, the right path will often unfold in front of them. He recommends the following four ways to build a culture where the truth is always heard:

Lead with questions, not answers. Engage in dialogue and debate, not coercion. Conduct autopsies without blame. Build “red flag” mechanisms for turning information into information that cannot be ignored. The Hedgehog Concept

Every morning the fox wakes up and starts crafting elaborate plans on how it will finally catch it’s nemesis, the hedgehog. It uses creative strategies, combining old ideas and trying to catch the hedgehog off guard. Yet every time the fox approaches the hedgehog, the small animal simply rolls up into a ball and waits until the fox leaves it alone. It does this on a daily basis, without fail. If it tried to run or use one of the fox’s tactics it would die, however it can consistently rely on it’s hedgehog strategy to save it’s hide and move forward with it’s life.

Your company’s hedgehog concept is the “one big thing” for your organization to understand and stick to. What does or can your organization do, understand, or use as your core solution to competitive threats and changes in the industry? The concept itself is similar to your core ideology (which never changes), differing only in the sense that it can be slightly less permanent. Your hedgehog concept must be something you are deeply passionate about, best at in the world, and are able to make a profit by doing. Figure out what falls into all three of these categories, and obtain an understanding and strategy based on it.

“Behold the turtle; he makes progress only when he sticks his neck out.”

– James Bryant Conant

A Culture of Discipline

Hire people who are disciplined in their own right. The second you need to manage someone, you have made a hiring mistake. Manage systems, not people. Collins believes this is superior to managing people because:

When you have disciplined people, you do not need hierarchy. When you have disciplined thought, you do not need bureaucracy. When you have disciplined action, you do not need excessive controls. The Flywheel Concept

A flywheel takes relentless pushing to get it to turn over even once, but after a while of pushing in the same direction it starts to gain momentum until it is a very powerful force. Collins contends that “Good to Great” transformations never happen all at once. They are the result of years of persistence. It might look dramatic and revolutionary from the outside, but on the inside it is more of an organic development process.

How to Win Friends And Influence People by Dale Carnegie

Pay for How to Win Friends And Influence People MP3 Audio Book Dale Carnegie with BONUS


6 Ways to Make People Like You (Audio)

1. Do This and You’ll Be Welcome Anywhere (Audio)
2. A Simple Way to Make a Good First Impression (Audio)
3. If You Don’t Do This, You Are Headed for Trouble (Audio)
4. An Easy Way to Become a Good Conversationalist (Audio)
5. How to Interest People (Audio)
6. How to Make People Like You Instantly (Audio)

How to Win People to Your Way of Thinking (Audio)
1. You Can’t Win an Argument (Audio)
2. A Sure Way of Making Enemies and How to Avoid It (Audio)
3. If You’re Wrong, Admit It (Audio)
4. A 3Drop of Honey (Audio)
5. The Secret of Socrates (Audio)
6. The Safety Valve In Handling Complaints (Audio)
7. How to Get Cooperation (Audio)
8. A Formula That Will Work Wonders for You (Audio)
9. What Everybody Wants (Audio)
10. An Appeal That Everybody Likes (Audio)
11. The Movies Do It. TV Does It. Why Don’t You Do It? (Audio)
12. When Nothing Else Works, Try This (Audio)

– Part IV:
1. If You Must Find Fault, This Is The Way To Begin (Audio)
2. How To Criticize – And Not Be Hated For It (Audio)
3. Talk About Your Own Mistakes First (Audio)
4. No One Likes To Take Orders (Audio)
5. Making People Glad To Do What You Want (Audio)
6. Let The Other Person Save Face (Audio)
7. How To Spur People On To Success (Audio)
8. Give A Dog A Good Name (Audio)
9. Make The Fault Seem Easy To Correct (Audio)

Learn:

The six ways to make people like you
The twelve ways to win people to your way of thinking
The nine ways to change people without arousing resentment
Table of Contents

Eight Things This Book Will Help You Achieve
Preface to Revised Edition
How This Book Was Written-And Why
Nine Suggestions on How to Get the Most Out of This Book
A Shortcut to Distinction
Part 1 – Fundamental Techniques In Handling People
1 – “If You Want to Gather Honey, Don’t Kick Over the Beehive”
2 – The Big Secret of Dealing with People
3 – “He Who Can Do This Has the Whole World with Him. He Who
Cannot, Walks a Lonely Way”
Eight Suggestions On How To Get The Most Out Of This Book
Part 2 – Six Ways To Make People Like You
1 – Do This and You’ll Be Welcome Anywhere
2 – A Simple Way to Make a Good Impression
3 – If You Don’t Do This, You Are Headed for Trouble
4 – An Easy Way to Become a Good Conversationalist
5 – How to Interest People
6 – How To Make People Like You Instantly
In A Nutshell
Part 3 – Twelve Ways To Win People To Your Way Of Thinking
1 – You Can’t Win an Argument
2 – A Sure Way of Making Enemies and How to Avoid It
3 – If You’re Wrong, Admit It
4 – The High Road to a Man’s Reason
5 – The Secret of Socrates
6 – The Safety Valve in Handling Complaints
7 – How to Get Co-operation
8 – A Formula That Will Work Wonders for You
9 – What Everybody Wants
10 – An Appeal That Everybody Likes
11 – The Movies Do It. Radio Does It. Why Don’t You Do It?
12 – When Nothing Else Works, Try This
In A Nutshell
Part 4 – Nine Ways To Change People Without Giving Offence Or
Arousing Resentment
1 – If You Must Find Fault, This Is the Way to Begin
2 – How to Criticize?and Not Be Hated for It
3 – Talk About Your Own Mistakes First
4 – No One Likes to Take Orders
5 – Let the Other Man Save His Face
6 – How to Spur Men on to Success
7 – Give the Dog a Good Name
8 – Make the Fault Seem Easy to Correct
9 – Making People Glad to Do What You Want
In A Nutshell
Part 5 – Letters That Produced Miraculous Results
Part 6 – Seven Rules For Making Your Home Life Happier
1 – How to Dig Your Marital Grave in the Quickest Possible Way
2 – Love and Let Live
3 – Do This and You’ll Be Looking Up the Time-Tables to Reno
4 – A Quick Way to Make Everybody Happy
5 – They Mean So Much to a Woman
6 – If you Want to be Happy, Don’t Neglect This One
7 – Don’t Be a “Marriage Illiterate”
In A Nutshell
————–
Eight Things This Book Will Help You Achieve
1. Get out of a mental rut, think new thoughts, acquire new
visions, discover new ambitions.
2. Make friends quickly and easily.
3. Increase your popularity.
4. Win people to your way of thinking.
5. Increase your influence, your prestige, your ability to get things
done.
6. Handle complaints, avoid arguments, keep your human contacts
smooth and pleasant.
7. Become a better speaker, a more entertaining conversationalist.
8. Arouse enthusiasm among your

Audible MBA reading list

General
1. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Leadership and Vision By Ramon J. Aldag, Ph.D. and Buck Joseph, Ed.D.
2. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Sales and Marketing By Michael A. Kamins, Ph.D.
3. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Growing and Managing a Business By Kathleen R. Allen, Ph.D.
4. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Analyzing Financial Statements: 25 Keys to Understanding Numbers (Unabr.) By Eric Press, Ph.D., CPA
5. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Business Planning: 25 Keys to a Sound Business Plan By Edward E. Williams, Ph.D., James R. Thompson, Ph.D. and H. Albert Napier, Ph.D.
6. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Going Global By Jeffrey H. Bergstrand, Ph.D.
7. The New York Times Pocket MBA: The Board of Directors By Marianne Jennings, J.D.
8. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Forecasting Budgets By Norman Moore, Ph.D.
9. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Organizing a Company By S. Jay Sklar, J.D. and Joseph N. Bongiovanni, J.D.
10. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Tracking & Controlling Costs By Mohamed Hussein, Ph.D.
11. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Business Financing By Dileep Rao, Ph.D. and Richard Cardozo, Ph.D
12. The New Portable M.B.A. By Eliza G.C. Collins and Mary Anne Devanna
Finance/Accounting
13. The 80/20 Principle by Richard Koch
14. The Millionaire Next Door by Thomas Stanley & William Danko
15. The Lazy Person’s Guide to Investing by Paul Farrell
16. Work Less, Live More by Bob Clyatt
Leadership
17. Lead the Field by Earl Nightingale
18. How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
19. Crucial Conversations by Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, and Al Switzler
20. 12: The Elements of Great Managing by Rodd Wagner & James Harter
21. What Got You Here Won’t Get You There by Marshall Goldsmith
22. Judgment by Noel Tichy & Warren Bennis
23. Getting to Yes
24. The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership: Follow Them and People Will Follow You by Maxwell (Summary)
25. The Art of Exceptional Living by Jim Rohn
Entrepreneurship
26. Ready, Fire, Aim by Michael Masterson
27. The 4-Hour Workweek by Timothy Ferriss
28. The Portable M.B.A. in Entrepreneurship By William D. Bygrave
Strategy
29. Blue Ocean Strategy by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne
30. Seeing What’s Next by Clayton M. Christensen, Erik A. Roth, Scott D. Anthony
31. Innovation and Entrepreneurship by Peter F. Drucker
Economics
32. The Portable M.B.A. in Economics By Philip K.Y. Young and John J. McAuley
Marketing
33. All Marketers Are Liars by Seth Godin
34. The Sales Bible by Jeffrey Gitomer
35. The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes
36. SPIN Selling by Neil Rackham
37. 3-D Negotiation by David A. Lax and James K. Sebenius
Management
38. Getting Things Done by David Allen
39. Cut to the Chase by Stuart Levine
40. The Unwritten Laws of Business by W.J. King
41. On Writing Well by William Zinsser
42. Made to Stick by Chip and Dan Heath
43. Deep Survival by Laurence Gonzales
44. The Goal by Eliyahu Goldratt
45. Lean Thinking by James Womack and Daniel Jones

I just posted a summary of this book in my Audible MBA blog.

1. The Law of the lid.

2. The Law of Influence.

3. The Law of Process.

4. The Law of Navigation.

5. The Law of E.F. Hutton.

6. The Law of Solid Ground.

7. The Law of Respect.

8. The Law of Intuition.

9. The Law of Magnetism.

10. The Law of Connection.

11. The Law of the Inner Circle.

12. The Law of Empowerment.

13. The Law of Reproduction.

14. The Law of Buy-In.

15. The Law of Victory..

16. The Law of Momentum.

17. The Law of Priorities.

18. The Law of Sacrifice.

19. The Law of Timing.

20. The Law of Explosive Growth.

21. The Law of Legacy.

Another Personal MBA

This is very similar to personal MBA and it is pretty cool. He actually setup goals for himself. If you look at the goals, they are pretty interesting. For example: Building a business on an advertising model.  However, I find this could be very limiting (too focus).  Again, I find more and more audible for traditional MBA.

I read a book called “Roaring 2000s” by Harry Dent. He is a Harvard MBA. His stock market theory is based on demographic and how it affect stock price. I have follow him since 2004. I think what he did was using technical analysis to predict stock. He did gain a lot of attention for all of his crazy, partially wrong predictions.

So, I think if you just read investment books, you will be better off than listening to these traditional MBA gurus.

I previously posted about the Audible MBA i am working on. Now, you can also can get a fantasy football MBA. A pretty cool concept, and funny. The blogger also have a MBA. Most people think Fantasy football is just a game. It actually provide a really good networking opportunity for you. The book is called Fantasy KICK. I guess I should add it to my MBA reading list 🙂 So, next time you are invited for the fantasy football, don’t say no.

Audible MBA

I started a new blog called Audible MBA If you heard of personal MBA or MBA on the run. This is a similar concept. I think professional or scientist can greatly benefit from this.

Essentially, you listen to the MBA audio books, read the book summaries, and then apply to your work/life.

It is a great way to get an education without the tuition. Check it out!

Method and curriculum
The methodology is a little complicated that just listen to the book. I suggest you to use the 3 basic styles of learning.

Step 1 Auditory Learning: You basically listen to the book.

Step 2 Visual Learning: You read the book summary (I plan on providing them as I finished them).

Step 3 Kinesthetic / Tactile Learning: You apply the book to your work (you are on your own on this one).

This system works best for me. After I go through all of these steps, I usually retain the book well.

Here is the curriculum. There is no particular order. Just go through them. I will update them as I find more Audio Books from the MBA reading list. So, check back frequently or subscribe for updated list.

General
1. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Leadership and Vision By Ramon J. Aldag, Ph.D. and Buck Joseph, Ed.D.
2. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Sales and Marketing By Michael A. Kamins, Ph.D.
3. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Growing and Managing a Business By Kathleen R. Allen, Ph.D.
4. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Analyzing Financial Statements: 25 Keys to Understanding Numbers (Unabr.) By Eric Press, Ph.D., CPA
5. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Business Planning: 25 Keys to a Sound Business Plan By Edward E. Williams, Ph.D., James R. Thompson, Ph.D. and H. Albert Napier, Ph.D.
6. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Going Global By Jeffrey H. Bergstrand, Ph.D.
7. The New York Times Pocket MBA: The Board of Directors By Marianne Jennings, J.D.
8. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Forecasting Budgets By Norman Moore, Ph.D.
9. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Organizing a Company By S. Jay Sklar, J.D. and Joseph N. Bongiovanni, J.D.
10. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Tracking & Controlling Costs By Mohamed Hussein, Ph.D.
11. The New York Times Pocket MBA: Business Financing By Dileep Rao, Ph.D. and Richard Cardozo, Ph.D
12. The New Portable M.B.A. By Eliza G.C. Collins and Mary Anne Devanna
Finance/Accounting
13. The 80/20 Principle by Richard Koch
14. The Millionaire Next Door by Thomas Stanley & William Danko
15. The Lazy Person’s Guide to Investing by Paul Farrell
16. Work Less, Live More by Bob Clyatt
Leadership
17. Lead the Field by Earl Nightingale
18. How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
19. Crucial Conversations by Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, and Al Switzler
20. 12: The Elements of Great Managing by Rodd Wagner & James Harter
21. What Got You Here Won’t Get You There by Marshall Goldsmith
22. Judgment by Noel Tichy & Warren Bennis
23. Getting to Yes
24. The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership: Follow Them and People Will Follow You by Maxwell (Summary)

25. The Art of Exceptional Living by Jim Rohn

Entrepreneurship
26. Ready, Fire, Aim by Michael Masterson
27. The 4-Hour Workweek by Timothy Ferriss
28. The Portable M.B.A. in Entrepreneurship By William D. Bygrave
Strategy
29. Blue Ocean Strategy by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne
30. Seeing What’s Next by Clayton M. Christensen, Erik A. Roth, Scott D. Anthony
31. Innovation and Entrepreneurship by Peter F. Drucker
Economics
32. The Portable M.B.A. in Economics By Philip K.Y. Young and John J. McAuley
Marketing
33. All Marketers Are Liars by Seth Godin
34. The Sales Bible: The Ultimate Sales Resource, New Edition by Jeffrey Gitomer (Summary)
35. The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes
36. SPIN Selling by Neil Rackham
37. 3-D Negotiation by David A. Lax and James K. Sebenius
Management

39. Cut to the Chase by Stuart Levine
40. The Unwritten Laws of Business by W.J. King
41. On Writing Well by William Zinsser
42. Made to Stick by Chip and Dan Heath
43. Deep Survival by Laurence Gonzales
44. The Goal by Eliyahu Goldratt
45. Lean Thinking by James Womack and Daniel Jon